Improvising camouflage using Bleach and a magic marker


It is always suggested, on the forums I frequent, that you should not wear camouflage every day as it attracts too much attention, and that every one should become the “grey man” to avoid looking like a “mall ninja”
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The greatest step in human evolution was and is agriculture


When we formulate plans for survival we often forget that the corner-stone of every civilization is agriculture.
De-evolving into a hunter-gather state is not sustainable, as food stocks within an area soon wither with large populations doing hunting and our ancestors acknowledged this and so developed farming to allow the food to “come to them”, allowing themselves time to do other things like develop technology and arts, learn and develop written and other military skills.
We should all learn from this, hunting takes way more time and effort than farming, and the yields in farming often create a surplus for trade, this allows division of labour and allows specialization making you better at what you do…
Continue reading The greatest step in human evolution was and is agriculture

Plant a Hedge to provide a light barrier when fences are not availible


Hedging is surprisingly simple and our ancestors understood the advantages of a natural barrier –

Hedging, if done correctly, can provide fruit, a thick barrier of thorn ridden, and foothold free cover, that weapons can be fired through,
difficult to climb as it is something thats outside yields but inside is solid. they can also contain hidden razor wire fences.
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Uses for PVC Conduit


Uses for PVC Conduit

This is a just a few of my idea’s surrounding pcv conduit

1. A good bow and arrow can be made
2. Can be used to make structures like chicken coups and greenhouses
3. Pedal carts for kids can be made with this
4. As a base for working with fiberglass
5. ground up can be added to black powder to make smoke bombs
6. Fencing support for hedges
7. Shafts for spears. Fishing poles

Star Fortresses


Star forts as i have discussed before seem a logical progression for protecting your community should things degrade to that level.

“Origins

Fortification plan of Coevorden, laid out in a radial pattern within polygonal fortifications and extensive outer earthworks as reconstructed in the early seventeenth century by Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange

The predecessors of star fortifications were medieval fortresses, usually placed on high hills. From there, arrows were shot at the enemies, and the higher the fortress was, the further the arrows flew. The enemies’ hope was to either ram the gate or climb over the wall with ladders and overrun the defenders. For the invading force, these fortifications proved quite difficult to overcome. Therefore, fortresses occupied a key position in warfare.

When the newly effective maneuverable siege cannon came into military strategy in the fifteenth century, the response from military engineers was to arrange for the walls to be embedded into ditches fronted by earthen slopes so that they could not be attacked by destructive direct fire and to have the walls topped by earthen banks that absorbed and largely dissipated the energy of plunging fire. Where conditions allowed, as in Fort Manoel in Malta, the ditches were cut into the native rock, and the wall at the inside of the ditch was simply unquarried native rock. As the walls became lower, they also became more vulnerable to assault.

Worse yet, the rounded shape that had previously been dominant for the design of turrets created “dead space”, or “dead” zones (see figure), which were relatively sheltered from defending fire, because direct fire from other parts of the walls could not be directed around the curved wall. To prevent this, what had previously been round or square turrets were extended into diamond-shaped points to give storming infantry no shelter. The ditches and walls channeled attacking troops into carefully constructed killing grounds where defensive cannons could wreak havoc on troops attempting to storm the walls, with emplacements set so that the attacking troops had no place to shelter from the defensive fire.

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Hot plug Diesel engines


Some technology of yester-year that is not very well know is that of hot plug engines.

These engines use a system similar to long stroke diesel engines and but do not develop the pressure that normal diesel engines do and so require a “hot” plug to be heated to ignite the fuel ,
these engines were common in tractors in the 1890’s and so on, until diesel engines were more reliable.

Wiki info on hot plug / bulb engines

This technology is interesting to us because it requires less precise machining
These engines were slow running (300-400 RPM) and mostly with cast iron parts including pistons,
the engine uses a carburettor because the charge only ignites when the mixture is compressed into the bulb .
A big attraction with the hot-bulb engine was its ability to run on a wide range of fuels. Even poor-burning fuels could be used since a combination of vaporiser- and compression-ignition meant that such fuels could be made to combust. The usual fuel used was fuel oil, similar to modern-day diesel, but natural gas, kerosene, paraffin, crude oil, vegetable oil or creosote could also be used.

Compared with steam, petrol, and diesel engines, hot-bulb engines are simpler and therefore have fewer potential problems. There is no electrical system, as found on a petrol engine, and no external boiler and steam system as on a steam engine.

Tilapia farming in africa


link to buying fingerling’s for Tilapia in Gauteng

Get your fingerling’s and start now farming Tilapia – best parts are they grow fast and are not restricted in urban area’s, so long as you can get a pond going you can have live stock .. even if its just a bath tub size fish farm and some lettuce making up an aquaphonics system.

Today i went to the local pick and pay – they were selling frozen tilapia , very interesting me thinks, first time i have seen it commercially available ready to eat, so i got some, lets see how good they are,

some more info go here

(update) the fish was ok … Pretty tasteless … But pleasant …. Price doubled over night … It was 35 a kg next time we went it was 65 … Way too much …