Category Archives: Fortification

Surveillance of a homestead


Ultimately surveillance is about using ears and eyes to gather information about a possible enemy and your surroundings, to get forewarning, to give you the largest tactical advantage, to plan an ambush or evacuate with as much warning as possible.

Extending coverage of these senses gives a longer warning, and more time for reacting to, or preparing for, a security threat.

In a scenario where our security is left up to ourselves (Without rule of law or WROL) we need to find Continue reading Surveillance of a homestead

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Nuclear War and Pandemic Survival tips


First off

get a Gieger counter NOW …. you can get cheap ones that will do well enough that plug into the audio jack of a cell phone  .. and cost under $35.

Decide whether you will  bug in and convert a basement room into a bunker, or setup a bug out fall out shelter far from your home either way Continue reading Nuclear War and Pandemic Survival tips

Sod house


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sod_house

The sod house or “soddy”[1] was a corollary to the log cabin during frontier settlement of Canada and the United States. The prairie lacked standard building materials such as wood or stone; however, sod from thickly-rooted prairie grass was abundant.[2] Prairie grass had a much thicker, tougher root structure than modern landscaping grass.

Construction of a sod house involved cutting patches of sod in rectangles, often 2’×1’×6” (600×300×150 mm) long, and piling them into walls. Builders employed a variety of roofing methods. Sod houses accommodate normal doors and windows. The resulting structure was a well-insulated but damp dwelling that was very inexpensive. Sod houses required frequent maintenance and were vulnerable to rain damage. Stucco or wood panels often protected the outer walls. Canvas or plaster often lined the interior walls.

Sod houses can stop bullets and can be made for next to nothing …they may no last forever but can be made quickly and last for many years if done well…

sod houses require only hand tools to construct and would make a great bug out location temporary structure as most of Gauteng is covered with grass lands ..

my ideal bug out location would include a house of brick, sod or sandbags , in the form of a court yard house .. these are usually constructed with windows facing inwards and a central pond for fish and drinking water … with all roof run-off going into the pond in the middle … all windows face inwards and fruit tree’s are grown in the court yard providing shade and food.

the outer walls are at least 3 meters high and very thick – only very small windows set high on the wall would face outwards

– 2 sets of gates- with inner and outer gates. and a dry mote to stop vehicle rams, complete the setup .

below grounds storage and underground safe rooms – or bunkers provide a last line of defense .

obviously, inline with my other posts, a number of  lines of fences and trip flares .

The role of Ferro-cement for Fortifications


Sand bags are good but soon rot … i prefer this method

Ferro-cement is a method of construction ( there are many ways to do it but here is mine) where you make a frame of steel mesh (about 2 inch mesh) … and attach chicken wire to it every few links. 

or start with EMPTY  Gabion’s   , ones of the right dimensions,  — preferably a thinner type like 1 a foot thick or less  – they are made in many sizes — 3 foot by 4 foot by 1/2 a foot and use them as you would bricks .. tying them together with wire, obviously with the 1/2 foot being the width of the wall.

kinda like this (please excuse mspaint art)


Then attach the chicken wire to the outside of the wall and what will form the inside and plaster .

Plaster with a very fine plaster mix on the chicken wire — let it set and re-plaster until its quite thick .. maybe 1 inch

Continue reading The role of Ferro-cement for Fortifications

Garrison


I said it a hundred times, get a garrison together — community rules … western military doctrine always maintains that only troops can hold ground…

This is idealistic and not my plan exactly but its an idea that can be applied elsewhere.

I would say the ideal in suburbia is the close off your street at both ends with a barricade ( we have this already ) .. get everyone in your street on board … link all the houses with radio or field telephones … establish a central meeting hall and guard house to coordinate everything, and provide a central kitchen, and central alarm should everyone need to wake up at once .

Dig the road up around the block to about 2 m deep and pile the rubble on the inside to form a parapet … use what you can to make a wall … cars … sand bags .. roof sheets with gravel whatever .. this is really just a trench to defend from. make a single entrance where the road is OK …

Continue reading Garrison

My idea for a survival spade/shovel


My idea for a survival spade/shovel

You can buy a shovel from lasher – looks for what is known as a “ladies spade” with a square blade LASHER link —product 162—

This spade has a steel shaft made of the same steel as the spade blade, that is hollow and can be welded closed at the bottom. Weld this opening closed. or use “Pratley putty” to close the opening. ( easier than welding)
Continue reading My idea for a survival spade/shovel

Importance of Concrete


Link to importance of concrete
Concrete has made building what it is today
Make sure you can partly improvise concrete it will help build fortifications and is paramount in the rebuilding of law and order.

Portland cement is the most common type of cement in general use around the world because it is a basic ingredient of concrete, mortar, stucco and most non-specialty grout. It usually originates from limestone. It is a fine powder produced by grinding clinker (more than 90%), a limited amount of calcium sulfate (which controls the set time).

Portland cement clinker is made by heating, in a kiln, a mixture of raw materials to a sintering temperature of about 1450 °C for modern cements. The aluminium oxide and iron oxide are present as a flux and contribute little to the strength. The major raw material for the clinker-making is usually limestone (CaCO3) mixed with a second material containing clay as source of alumino-silicate.

Normally, an impure limestone which contains clay or SiO2 is used. The CaCO3 content of these limestones can be as low as 80%. Second raw materials (materials in the rawmix other than limestone) depend on the purity of the limestone. Some of the second raw materials used are clay, shale, sand, iron ore, bauxite, fly ash and slag. When a cement kiln is fired by coal, the ash of the coal acts as a secondary raw material.